New member artists

ARS represents over 60,000 visual artists and estates. Below are selected highlights about some of our most recent and more prominent member artists.


DONALD JUDD

ARS is very pleased to announce that the Judd Foundation has become a member of ARS. Donald Judd remains one of the most significant artists of the twentieth century, whose radical ideas and work continue to provoke and influence the fields of art, architecture, and design. Born in Excelsior Springs, Missouri, and after having served in the United States Army, Judd attended the College of William and Mary, and Columbia University, receiving his B.S. in Philosophy, cum laude, from the latter. Judd began his career as a painter and transitioned to three-dimensional work in the early 1960s. Throughout his lifetime, in his writings and his work, he advocated for the importance of art and the artist's role in society. In his essay "Specific Objects" (1964), he rejected illusion and representational space in art, juxtaposing it to real space, which his works inhabited. For almost four decades, Judd exhibited regularly throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia. Major exhibitions of his work include the Whitney Museum of American Art (1968, 1988), New York in 1968 and 1988, the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (1975); Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (1987); The Museum of Modern Art, New York (1995); and Tate Modern, London (2004).   

Above: Untitled (Stack) 1967. © 2016 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.  Image courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art / Art Resource

Above: Untitled (Stack) 1967. © 2016 Judd Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.  Image courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art / Art Resource


ANDREW WYETH

Andrew Newell Wyeth was one of the best-known U.S. artists of the 20th-century. In his work, Wyeth's primary subjects were the land and people around him, both in his hometown of Chadds Ford, PA and at his summer home in Cushing, ME. Wyeth often noted: "I paint my life."

One of the most famous images in 20th-century American art is his painting Christina's World, currently in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Above: Andrew Wyeth, Christina's World, 1948. Tempera on panel, 32 1/4 x 47 3.4 in (81.9 x 121.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Andrew Wyeth / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital image © The Museum of Modern Art / Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY.

Above: Andrew Wyeth, Christina's World, 1948. Tempera on panel, 32 1/4 x 47 3.4 in (81.9 x 121.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Andrew Wyeth / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital image © The Museum of Modern Art / Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY.


GEE'S BEND QUILTERS

ARS is pleased to announce the membership of eleven of the renowned quiltmakers of Gee's Bend: Mary McCarthy, Jessie T. Pettway, Qunnie Pettway, Lucy T. Pettway, Ella Mae Irby, Mensie Lee Pettway, America Irby, Lucy Mingo, Essie Bendolph Pettway, Nancy Pettway, Mary L. Bennett, Rita Mae Pettway, Ruth Pettway Mosely, Lola Pettway, Loretta Pettway Bennett, Helen McCloud, Addie Pearl Nicholson, Mertlene Perkins, Belinda Pettway, China Pettway, Leola Pettway, Linda Pettway, Martha Pettway, Bettie Bendolph Pettway, Irene Williams and Nell Hall Williams.

Above: Mary L. Bennet, Diamonds Variation - One Patch, c. 1975. Cotton (twill, knit, even weave), 76 x 67 in. © 2016 Mary L. Bennet / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital image © Pitkin Studio / Art Resource, NY.

Above: Mary L. Bennet, Diamonds Variation - One Patch, c. 1975. Cotton (twill, knit, even weave), 76 x 67 in. © 2016 Mary L. Bennet / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital image © Pitkin Studio / Art Resource, NY.



Meow Wolf

Founded in 2008, the cutting-edge art collective Meow Wolf focuses on creating entirely immersive, invigorating and hands-on art experiences. Through their art installations, Meow Wolf pushes the boundaries of what it means to exhibit and experience art.   

Currently the group is exhibiting "The House of Eternal Return" from their permanent headquarters in Santa Fe. In the past, Meow Wolf has worked on projects such as "Omega Mart" (2012), which enlisted the help of local students to stock the shelves of a store with invented goods, and "Auto Wolf" (2009), an installation that commented on the recycling of cars. Meow Wolf invites the community at large to engage with the work at all levels of production, and in doing so produces a dialogue with the public about current social issues. 

Above: Omega Mart. © 2016 Meow Wolf / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Above: Omega Mart. © 2016 Meow Wolf / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


The Estate of Miriam Schapiro

Widely known as a leading force of the Feminist Art Movement, Miriam Schapiro had a long and influential career. As a young artist, she integrated into the New York School alongside her husband, Paul Brach. Recognized for her colorful and sensuous abstractions of this period, Schapiro had several solo exhibitions at the prestigious André Emmerich Gallery in New York. Despite considerable success, she felt an outsider to the male-dominated Abstract Expressionism scene. In 1967, Schapiro moved to California where she became a lecturer at UCSD. In San Diego, Schapiro was exposed to a scientific art community and cool West Coast formalism. An inveterate pioneer, Schapiro developed a unique way of painting that was facilitated by a computer program that aided in the development of her hard-edge compositions. In 1972, Schapiro moved to CalArts where, along with Judy Chicago, she formed the Feminist Art Program that produced the historically significant exhibition, Womanhouse, an installation and performance space that gained international attention and remains a catalyst for the Feminist Art Movement. Upon returning to her studio practice, Schapiro incorporated collage into her formal compositions, using gendered materials to create her signature femmages. Continuing in this vein, Schapiro became a founder of the Pattern and Decoration movement in the mid-1970's. Committed to the feminist imperative of her career, Schapiro traveled around the country giving lectures on feminism and art, leading the conversation and movement that earned her the nickname "Mimi Appleseed". Schapiro remained active into the early 2000's, integrating themes of art historical 'collaborations', theater, and her Jewish heritage into her later work. Schapiro has been the subject of numerous exhibitions and her work is held in collections worldwide, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art (New York), and the Museum of Fine Art (Boston).

Above: Wonderland. 1983. © 2016 The Estate of Miriam Schapiro / Artists Rights Society(ARS), New York

Above: Wonderland. 1983. © 2016 The Estate of Miriam Schapiro / Artists Rights Society(ARS), New York


FAITH RINGGOLD

Faith Ringgold is a painter, writer, speaker, mixed media sculptor and performance artist. From 1955 to 1973 Ringgold taught in New York City public schools and spent many summers in Provincetown, MA, painting. Her early paintings addressed civil rights and other political issues.

She is perhaps best known for her story quilts. Beginning with Echoes of Harlem, 1980, on which she collaborated with her mother, Ringgold's story quilts blur the line between traditional craft and fine art, while depicting family and collective cultural experience. Ringgold published her first children's book based on her quilt Tar Beach in 1991, which received numerous awards and has been followed by many other publications.

Faith Ringgold has received 21 honorary degress, and established the Anyone Can Fly Foundation. This non-profit organization was created to promote artists working in the tradition of the African Diaspora, with the object of introducing these traditions to children as well as adults.

Above: Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach, 1988. Acrylic on canvas, 74 x 96 in. © 2016 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital image courtesy of Faith Ringgold / Art Resource, NY.

Above: Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach, 1988. Acrylic on canvas, 74 x 96 in. © 2016 Faith Ringgold / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital image courtesy of Faith Ringgold / Art Resource, NY.


THORNTON DIAL

Using paint and found objects, Thornton Dial created mixed media works to express his reactions to issues such as war, racism, poverty, and the relationship between men and women. Dial said of his process: "I start on a picture when I get a whole lot of stuff together. And then I look at the piece and think about life."

Many people would consider Dial an "outsider artist" a a result of him having worked as a laborer in the Deep South for most of his life. However, his use of color and fluid lines in his richly-textured assemblages have led some art critics to liken Dial to established art world figures such as Jackson Pollock and Robert Rauschenberg.

Above: Thornton Dial, African Jungle Picture: If the Ladies Had Knew the Snakes Wouldn't Bite Them They Wouldn't Have Hurt the Snakes; If the Snakes Had Knew the Ladies Wouldn't Hurt Them They Wouldn't Have Bit the Ladies, 1989. Enamel, industrial sealing compound, wire on wood, 48 3/4 x 96 in (123.8 x 243.8 cm). Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, Dc. © 2016 Estate of Thornton Dial / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital image © Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC / Art Resource, NY.

Above: Thornton Dial, African Jungle Picture: If the Ladies Had Knew the Snakes Wouldn't Bite Them They Wouldn't Have Hurt the Snakes; If the Snakes Had Knew the Ladies Wouldn't Hurt Them They Wouldn't Have Bit the Ladies, 1989. Enamel, industrial sealing compound, wire on wood, 48 3/4 x 96 in (123.8 x 243.8 cm). Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, Dc. © 2016 Estate of Thornton Dial / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Digital image © Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC / Art Resource, NY.